Revenue Intervention

ROS Pay & File Extension Date – 2023

 

 

Today, the Revenue Commissioners announced that the extended ROS Pay & File deadline date for self assessed taxpayers is 15th November 2023.

 

 

This extended deadline applies to:

  • Certain self assessed Income Tax payers who both pay and file through ROS.

  • Taxpayers liable to file Capital Acquisitions Tax Returns and payments, as beneficiaries in relation to gifts and/or inheritances with valuation dates in the year ended 31st August 2023.   The extension is only available to Taxpayers who both pay and file through ROS.

 

Please be aware that this extension is only available to taxpayers who both pay and file through ROS. In situations where only one of these actions is completed through ROS, then the deadline for submission and payment is 31st October 2023.

 

 

 

For further information, please click: Revenue eBrief No. 088/23

 

 

 

Please be aware that the information contained in this article is of a general nature.  It is not intended to address specific circumstances in relation to any individual or entity. All reasonable efforts have been made by Accounts Advice Centre to provide accurate and up-to-date information, however, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate on the date it is received or that it will continue to remain so.. This information should not be acted upon without full and comprehensive, specialist professional tax advice.

 

 

Revenue “Cancellation of Income Tax Registrations” Notice

 

 

From 10th February 2023 the Revenue Commissioners are posting out letters to taxpayers who are currently registered for Income Tax but who have not submitted Income Tax Returns for years of assessment up to and including 2021.

 

 

The letters state:

“Based on a review of your Income Tax records, you have not filed any self-assessed Income Tax returns for years up to and including 2021.”

 

Taxpayers should start receiving such letters from 13th February onwards.

 

Please be aware that your Tax Agent won’t receive a copy of this notice.

 

 

 

What are you required to do?

In the event that the taxpayer is no longer deemed to be a “chargeable person” and, therefore, is no longer required to file an Income Tax Returns, he/she/they should cancel the Income Tax registration.

 

The term “chargeable person” applies to an individual who:

  1. Is self employed or
  2. Is a Director of an Irish company or
  3. Has other sources of income in addition to a PAYE salary.

 

An individual who is in receipt of PAYE income as well as non-PAYE income will not, however, be regarded as a “chargeable person” provided:

  1. the total gross income from non-PAYE sources is less than €30,000 and
  2. the net assessable income is less than €5,000 and
  3. the tax is collected by reducing his/her/their tax credits through the PAYE system.

 

A chargeable person is obliged to file an annual Income Tax Return through the self-assessment system.

 

 

 

 

How can you cancel your IT registration?

This can be done online via ROS or by completing a Form TRCN1 which is available on the Revenue website.

 

 

 

 

What happens if you are considered to be a “Chargeable Person”?

If the taxpayer is considered a “chargeable person” but has not filed Income Tax Returns up to 2021, the letter is deemed to be a Final Reminder to file all outstanding income tax returns.

If the taxpayer does not file the outstanding Income Tax Returns or cancel the registration within 21 days of the letter, Revenue will cease the income tax registration without further notice.

Once the Income Tax registration is ceased, if the taxpayer wishes to re-register for income tax he/she/they will be required to submit an online application via ROS.

 

 

 

Final Points

 

The Notice states:

“You should note that, where further information comes to Revenue’s attention that you were a chargeable person for any relevant tax year, Revenue reserves the right to reinstate your Income Tax registration.

The non-filing of a required tax return by chargeable persons can result in further contact from Revenue, including a follow-up compliance intervention. Non-filing of a return where required is also an offence for which a person can be prosecuted.”

 

 

 

If you have received a Cancellation of your Income Tax Registration Notice and you require assistance filing outstanding Income Tax Returns, please contact us at queries@accountsadvicecentre.ie

 

 

 

Please be aware that the information contained in this article is of a general nature.  It is not intended to address specific circumstances in relation to any individual or entity. All reasonable efforts have been made by Accounts Advice Centre to provide accurate and up-to-date information, however, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate on the date it is received or that it will continue to remain so.. This information should not be acted upon without full and comprehensive, specialist professional tax advice.

BUDGET 2023 – Ireland

 

 

Today, Minister for Finance, Paschal Donohoe T.D., and Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, Michael McGrath T.D. presented Budget 2023.

 

 

GLOBAL MOBILITY & EMPLOYMENT

Minister Donohoe announced an extension to a number of existing personal tax reliefs including:

  • Special Assignee Relief Programme (SARP) is to be extended to the end of 2025.  The minimum income threshold for an employee to qualify for SARP is being increased from €75,000 to €100,000 for new entrants.  Existing claimants will not be affected by this change.  In other words, this higher qualifying threshold will not apply to current claimants availing of the relief.
  • Key Employee Engagement Programme (KEEP) is to be extended to the end of 2025.  The lifetime company limit for KEEP shares will be raised from €3 million to €6 million.  KEEP is also being modified to provide for the buy-back of KEEP shares by the company from the relevant employee.
  • Foreign Earnings Deduction (FED) which is a relief for employees who are tax resident in Ireland and who travel out of the State to temporarily carry out employment duties in certain qualifying countries was extended for a further three years to the end of 2025. FED provides relief from income tax on up to €35,000 of income.
  • Another significant development was the doubling of the Small Business Exemption from €500 to €1,000 effective from 2022. Employers will also be permitted to grant an employee two vouchers/non-cash awards in a single year, provided the cumulative value of the two vouchers does not exceed €1,000.

 

 

PERSONAL TAX

Key measures include:

  • A significant increase in the Standard Rate Cut-Off Point to €40,000 for single individuals and €49,000 for married couples with one earner. This means that a single person can now earn an additional €3,200 before paying tax at the 40% Income Tax rate.

 

  • An increase of €75 in the Personal Tax Credit, Employee Tax Credit and the Earned Income Tax Credit (all currently set at €1,700). For the tax year 2023 onwards the new tax credits be each be €1,775

 

  • An increase of €100 in the Home Carer tax credit. From 2023 it will be increased to €1,700.

 

  • A reintroduction of the rent tax credit of up to €500 for renters in the private sector for 2023 to 2025. It will be possible to claim this tax credit on a retrospective basis in relation to rent paid in 2022.  One credit per person can be claimed per year.

 

  • The Sea-going Naval Personnel Tax Credit has been extended to the end of 2023.

 

  • An increase in the ceiling of the 2% USC rate from €21,295 to €22,920.

 

  • The exemption from the top rate of USC for medical card holders, and those aged over seventy years earning under €60,000 will continue beyond 2022. In other words, the reduced rate of 2% USC will be extended until the end of 2023.

 

  • There is no increase to Employer’s PRSI rates.

 

 

ENTERPRISE

  • The Temporary Business Energy Support Scheme (TBESS) was introduced to support trading businesses. The scheme will be open to businesses carrying on a Case I trade that are tax compliant and have experienced a significant increase in their natural gas and electricity costs. Businesses carrying on trading activities will be eligible for a refund of 40% on the increase in electricity and gas prices, subject to a monthly cap of €10,000 per trade.  Detailed information on the scheme has not yet been published, however, it is believed the scheme will operate by comparing the average unit price for the relevant period in 2022 with the average unit price for the corresponding period in 2021. If the increase in average unit price is more than 50% then the business will be eligible for the scheme. Businesses will be required to register for the scheme and to make claims within the required time limits.  This scheme is subject to State Aid approval from the EU.

 

  • Amendments will be made to the R&D tax credit regime with respect to how repayments are made under the scheme which will ensure the regime is regarded as a “qualifying refundable credit” for the purposes of the Pillar Two Model Rules. Currently the R&D tax credit is firstly offset against current and prior year corporation tax liabilities followed by repayment over three instalments. The current system is being changed to a new fixed three-year payment system. A company will have an option to call for payment of their eligible R&D Tax Credit or to request for it to be offset against other tax liabilities. In other words, the changes will enable taxpayer companies to call for the payment of their R&D tax credits in cash or for these to be offset against its tax liabilities in this three-year fixed period. The existing caps on the payable element of the credit are being removed. The first €25,000 of a claim will now be payable in the first year.  Transitional measures will be introduced for one year for those that already engaged in R&D activities and claiming the credit

 

  • An extension to the Knowledge Development Box regime for a further four years to 31st December 2026. Currently the KDB provides for a 6.25% effective rate of corporation tax on profits generated from exploiting certain assets, including patents and software developed through R&D activities carried out in Ireland. In preparation for the changes under the OECD Pillar Two agreement, the effective rate under the KDB regime is to be increased from 6.25% to 10%.  The policy document released by the Department of Finance states that the commencement of this rate will be determined by reference to international progress on the implementation of the Pillar Two Agreement but it is expected in 2023.

 

  • The extension of the Film Corporation Tax Credit until December 2028. Film relief is granted at a rate of 32% of qualifying expenditure which is capped at €70 million.

 

 

 

PROPERTY

 

Help-to-Buy Scheme

The scheme will continue at current rates for another two years and will expire on 31st December 2024

 

 

 

Vacant Homes Tax (“VHT”)

A VHT will apply to residential properties which are occupied for less than 30 days in a 12 month period.

Exemptions will apply where the property is vacant for “genuine reasons.”

The applicable tax rate is three times the existing local property tax (“LPT”) rate

 

 

 

Residential Development Stamp Duty Refund Scheme

The stamp duty refund scheme will continue until the end of 2025.

The stamp duty residential land rebate scheme allows for a refund of eleven-fifteenths of the stamp duty paid on land that is subsequently developed for residential purposes. was due to expire on 31 December 2022. It has been extended to the end of 2025.

 

 

 

Pre-letting Expenses on Certain Vacant Residential Properties

The limit for landlords claiming allowable pre-letting expenses is to be increased from €5,000 to €10,000.

The vacancy period is to be reduced from 12 months to 6 months.

 

 

 

Levy on Concrete Blocks, Pouring Concrete and other Concrete Products

A 10% levy was announced in response to the significant funding required in respect of the defective blocks redress scheme. A 10% levy will be applied to concrete blocks, pouring concrete, and certain other concrete products

This levy applies from 3rd April 2023.

 

 

 

VAT

 

9% VAT rate for hospitality and tourism sector

The 9% VAT rate currently in place to support the tourism and hospitality sectors will continue until 28th February 2023.

 

 

 

9% VAT rate on electricity and gas supplies

The temporary reduction in the VAT rate applicable to gas and electricity supplies (from 13.5% to 9%) will be extended to 28th February 2023.

 

 

Farmers’ Flat-Rate Addition

The flat-rate addition is being reduced from 5.5% to 5% in accordance with criteria set out in the EU VAT Directive.

This change will apply from 1st January 2023.

 

 

Zero-rated supplies

From 1st January 2023 VAT on newspapers, including digital editions will be reduced from 9% to 0%.

 

 

 

Please be aware that the information contained in this article is of a general nature.  It is not intended to address specific circumstances in relation to any individual or entity. All reasonable efforts have been made by Accounts Advice Centre to provide accurate and up-to-date information, however, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate on the date it is received or that it will continue to remain so.. This information should not be acted upon without full and comprehensive, specialist professional tax advice.

New Code of Practice for Revenue Compliance Interventions

 

The Revenue Commissioners published a new Code of Practice for Revenue Compliance Interventions today which will be effective from 1st May 2022 and will apply to all compliance interventions notified on/after that date.  The revised Code applies to all taxes and duties, with the exception of Customs.

 

The revised Code reflects Revenue’s new Compliance Intervention Framework and the key changes include:

  1. A three tier designation of Revenue Interventions and

  2. The introduction of Risk Review categories of Intervention.

 

 

Level 1

Level 1 Interventions are aimed at assisting taxpayers to bring their tax affairs in order voluntarily.  They are designed to support compliance by reminding taxpayers of their obligations. They also provide them with the opportunity to correct errors without the need for a more in-depth Revenue intervention. These include the following:

  1. Self-reviews

  2. Profile interviews

  3. Bulk issue non-filer reminders

  4. Actions that fall under the Co-operative Compliance Framework.

 

 

The expected outcomes of Level 1 Interventions:

  1. Liability under relevant tax head(s).

  2. Statutory Interest

  3. Reduced penalties. In situations where self correction is an option, no penalties should arise.

  4. No Prosecution.

  5. No Publication.

 

 

 

In Summary:

  • Level 1 interventions can only occur where the Revenue Commissioners have not already engaged in any detailed examination, review, audit or investigation of the matters under consideration.

  • Examples include VAT verification check letters requesting backup documentation to support refund claims, reminder notifications in relation to outstanding tax returns, questionnaires for R&D Tax Credit claims, requests to self-review on specific issues, etc.

  • A Level 1 Intervention allows for an unprompted qualifying disclosure.

  • Unprompted qualifying disclosures cannot be made at any level other than Level 1.

  • The definition of a Profile Interview has changed in the new Code. A Profile Interview will now be used by Revenue to familiarise itself with a specific taxpayer.  Previously it was used to assess a set of taxpayer risks to ascertain whether or not a Revenue audit was required.

  • If the Revenue Commissioners identify a compliance risk during a Profile Interview, they may initiate a Level 2 or Level 3 intervention.

  • A Level 1 Compliance Intervention allows for (i) self corrections and (ii) unprompted qualifying disclosure.

  • When making an unprompted qualifying disclosure, it is essential to disclose the tax defaults for the tax heads and the tax periods which are the subject of the disclosure. To be completely compliant, the taxpayer must also include all previously undisclosed tax defaults in the ‘deliberate default’ category under any tax head and/or any tax period.

 

 

Important Change

According to the new Code, self-corrections can continue to be made the taxpayer is within the relevant time limits

From 1st May 2022 any such self-corrections must be made in writing.

The submission of an amended return on ROS will no be longer sufficient to qualify as a written notification.

Therefore, to qualify as a self correction, a written notification must be provided as well as any amendment made on ROS.

 

 

 

 

Level 2

One of the more fundamental changes to the revised Code is the introduction of the ‘Risk Review’ as a Level 2 Intervention. Level 2 interventions are used by Revenue to confront compliance risks ranging from the examination of a single issue within a Tax Return to a full and comprehensive Revenue Audit.  An ‘unprompted qualifying disclosure’ will not be available to a taxpayer who receives notification of a Risk Review in respect of the specified tax head and tax period.  Taxpayers will, however, have the option to make a prompted qualifying disclosure when notified of a Level 2 intervention.

There are two types of Level 2 Interventions:

  1. Risk Reviews

  2. Audits

 

 

 

 

Level 2 Interventions – Risk Review

  • A Risk Review is generally a desk based intervention which focuses on a particular issue or issues contained in a tax return or a risk identified by Revenue’s own system.

  • Unlike level 1 interventions, there is no option for a taxpayer to make a self-correction or an unpromoted qualifying disclosure once they have been notified of a level 2 compliance intervention.

  • A written notification will be issued to the taxpayer.

  • The notice will specify the scope of the tax review, outlining which information is to be provided within a twenty eight day period.

  • The notification will also clarify whether the intervention is a risk review or an audit.

  • The review will take place twenty eight days from the date of the notification.

  • Generally, Risk Reviews will be carried out by correspondence.

  • Taxpayers will have twenty one days in which to notify Revenue if they intend to make a prompted qualifying disclosure.

  • A prompted qualifying disclosure can be made within twenty eight days of a notification of a level 2 intervention, with the possibility of requesting an additional sixty days.

  • In circumstances where a prompted qualifying disclosure is made, it must be made along with the relevant tax and statutory interest paid, before the expiry of the twenty eight day period.

  • The prompted qualifying disclosure must include all underpayments in respect of that particular tax head for the period in question and not just the particular issue which is the subject of the Risk Review. If the taxpayer fails to disclose any underpayments at this point then it is likely that higher penalties could ensue along with an increased risk of publication on Revenue’s Tax Defaulters List.

  • A prompted qualifying disclosure may allow the taxpayer the opportunity to mitigate penalties, avoid prosecution and/or avoid publication on the tax defaulters’ list.

  • Failure to respond to the Risk Review Notification may result in an on-site visit by Revenue or a full Revenue Audit.

 

 

 

Level 2 Interventions – Revenue Audit

A “Revenue Audit” is an examination of the compliance of a taxpayer.  It focuses on the accuracy of specific tax returns, statements, claims, declarations, etc. Broadly speaking, the operation of a Revenue Audit will remain the same under the revised Code.  An audit will be initiated where there is a greater level of perceived risk.  Also, please keep in mind that an audit may be extended to include additional tax risks depending on information discovered by Revenue during the audit process.

The main stages in a typical Revenue audit are unchanged under the new Code and can be summarised as follows:

  1. The taxpayer receives a Notification Letter which confirms the type of compliance intervention to be undertaken as well as the tax head(s) and period(s) covered. The notice also contains the audit commencement date and location in addition to the books and records to be made available for inspection.

  2. The audit will commence twenty eight days after the date of the notification.

  3. It is possible for businesses to request an alternative date in circumstances where the commencement date is not feasible for them.

  4. A pre-audit meeting can be carried out, where necessary, to ascertain the nature and availability of electronic records.

  5. It is possible to make a prompted qualifying disclosure before the start of the Audit. In order to make such a disclosure, tax and statutory interest must be paid in full.  A penalty does not need to be included.  The taxpayer must sign a declaration that the disclosure is complete and correct.

  6. Taxpayers may request an additional sixty days in order to prepare a prompted qualifying disclosure. This must be done within twenty one days of the date of the Audit Notification.

  7. Opening meeting – At the start of this meeting, the Auditor explains the purpose of the audit and indicates how long it should take. At this point, the Taxpayer has the opportunity to make a prompted qualifying disclosure.  This meeting provides the taxpayer with the opportunity to demonstrate to Revenue the tax controls in place. The Revenue auditor will examine the books and records as well as the prompted qualifying disclosure, raise queries and interview the taxpayer.  The information and explanations provided by the taxpayer will define the focus areas of the audit as well as influencing its outcome.

  8. Revenue will meet the Taxpayer to outline the audit findings.

  9. If the tax return is correct, the taxpayer will be informed as soon as there is certainty. If, however, the return requires amendment, the Auditor will discuss this with the Taxpayer and provide written clarification.

  10. At the close of the audit there will be a final meeting to agree on the total settlement when the taxpayer should pay the required amount to the Auditor.

  11. Following on from the audit, assessments may be raised or actions carried out to recover additional or disputed tax liabilities, where necessary.

 

 

Level 3 Intervention

Level 3 interventions take the form of investigations. These would generally be focused on suspected tax fraud and evasion.  A ‘Revenue Investigation’ is an examination of a taxpayer’s affairs where Revenue believes that serious tax or duty evasion may have occurred.  As the Revenue investigation may lead to a criminal prosecution, it is always recommended to seek expert professional advice and assistance in such situations.

A taxpayer is not entitled to make a qualifying disclosure from the date of commencement of the investigation, however, a taxpayer can seek to mitigate penalties by cooperating fully with a level 3 intervention.

Taxpayers will generally be notified of a Level 3 intervention in writing.  However, in certain cases Revenue may carry out an unannounced visit or may carry out investigations without notifying the taxpayer in writing.

Just to reiterate, once an investigation is initiated, the taxpayer cannot make a qualifying disclosure in relation to the matters under investigation.

 

 

 

 

FINAL POINTS

The main changes in the new Code of Practice for Revenue Compliance Interventions are:

  1. The new Risk Review which is classed in the same category as a Revenue Audit. Once a taxpayer is notified of a Risk Review, the option of making an unprompted qualifying disclosure is removed.  This means the taxpayer will be subject to increased penalties and possible publication on the Revenue’s Tax Defaulters’ list.

  2. A Risk Review generally requires clarification of a specific tax related issue, however, in order for a prompted disclosure to qualify, the disclosure must cover all tax defaults in relation to that particular tax head and the period(s) outlined in the notification. If, however, the default is considered to be in the deliberate default category, the disclosure must cover all tax heads and all tax periods.

  3. There is a 28 day period between the date of the Notification and the commencement of the Risk Review or Audit.

  4. Under the new Code, where the tax underpayment or an incorrectly claimed refund is less than €50,000, publication on the Revenue’s Tax Defaulters’ list will not arise. This increased threshold relates to the tax liability only and does not include interest and/or penalties.

  5. Under the new Code, the exclusion from mitigation of penalties in relation to disclosures pertaining to offshore matters has been removed. This means the taxpayer can now include tax defaults relating to offshore matters in qualifying disclosures and benefit from mitigated penalties.

 

 

 

For full information, please click: https://www.revenue.ie/en/tax-professionals/documents/code-of-practice-revenue-compliance-interventions.pdf

 

 

 

 

To book an appointment to discuss any Revenue correspondence you may have received in relation to a Level 1, Level 2 or Level 3 Intervention, please email us at queries@accountsadvicecentre.ie

 

 

 

 

Please be aware that the information contained in this article is of a general nature.  It is not intended to address specific circumstances in relation to any individual or entity. All reasonable efforts have been made by Accounts Advice Centre to provide accurate and up-to-date information, however, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate on the date it is received or that it will continue to remain so.. This information should not be acted upon without full and comprehensive, specialist professional tax advice.